Collaborations No.1 and No. 2 - 2014, 2016

Collaborations No. 1 and No.2 feature tracks written in collaboration with artists Alev Lenz, Yuri Kono, Marie Schreer, Bruised Skies and feature re-works from worriedaboutsatan, Tom Adams, Will Samson, VLMA and Message to Bears. The artwork is by Jack Piers Scott. 

'Yuri Kono weaves a gently poetic tale of loss and longing as she sings lyrics of “Kawaita Suki /The Barren Moon” in Japanese. Her voice seems fragile and ethereal, but grows in power as she summons fervent swells of emotion from a string section composed of Marie Schreer along with John Garner, Francis Gallagher, Naomi McClean, and Gwen Reed.'

Stationary Travels

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On the deeply moving “Her Bir Çocuk / Every Single Child”, a compassionate reaction to witnessing the suffering of children in Europe’s refugee crisis, Alev Lenz chooses to sing the poignant chorus in Turkish with heart-rending results and devastating intensity as the string quintet returns to transcendently echo her pleas.

Bu dünyaya her bir doğan çocuk  (Every child born to this world)
Insanlık ve güzellik görsün  (Should see humanity and beauty)
Dudaklarindan annesi öpsün  (Lips kissed by their mother)
Kirpiklerinde yaş kalmasın  (No tear left on their lashes)

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'The two main tracks – “Stille” and “Somnus” – are complementary opposites.  “Stille” is the more accessible track, the only overt lyric being the title.  Mournful strings are laid atop a shy piano; the cello provides a deep anchor, while the violins and viola attempt to lasso the clouds.  The music is thoughtful and meditative, with Lenv’s heavenly voice providing a nearly gothic tone.  “Somnus” is instrumental and languid, like the passengers of a boat waving goodbye.  Who knows where their journey will take them?'  A Closer Listen

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'The two main tracks – “Stille” and “Somnus” – are complementary opposites.  “Stille” is the more accessible track, the only overt lyric being the title.  Mournful strings are laid atop a shy piano; the cello provides a deep anchor, while the violins and viola attempt to lasso the clouds.  The music is thoughtful and meditative, with Lenv’s heavenly voice providing a nearly gothic tone.  “Somnus” is instrumental and languid, like the passengers of a boat waving goodbye.  Who knows where their journey will take them?'  A Closer Listen